History of CREHO-Ramsar

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The Ramsar Regional Center for Training and Research for the Western Hemisphere (later referred to as CREHO) has its origins in the Conference of the Contracting Parties to the Ramsar Convention.

The approval for its creation had different moments and spaces for consultation and approval, from the Conference of the Parties, the Permanent Committee of the Ramsar Convention, the Central American Commission on Environment and Development integrated by the environment ministers, followed by internal legislative processes in Panama.

CREHO is an organization that was born in the framework of Resolution VII.26 of 1999, with which the Conference of the Contracting Parties to the Ramsar Convention, “expresses its approval to the initiative of the Government of Panama to establish a Ramsar Regional Center for Training and Research on Wetlands in the Western Hemisphere, within the framework of the “City of Knowledge” Complex.

This resolution went through a prior process of consultations and negotiation between countries within the framework of the CCAD, as stated by Honduras in SC 21 of 1998 “speaking on behalf of Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic (GRUCA), expresses its support for the Ramsar Regional Center Project, already expressed by the Ministers of Environment and Development in its 19th. meeting, held in Belize in April 1998, and at the Pan-American Ramsar regional meeting, held in San José in June 1998. The objective of this initiative is to strengthen training and research activities regarding wetlands of international importance in the Western Hemisphere.”